Technology and institutions coevolve. Institutions can encourage or discourage innovation and adoption of technologies. Technological change, in turn, can drive institutional change. This dynamic has reached a critical phase in the electricity sector where low-cost and subsidized intermittent renewable energy is upsetting old models of grid management and stability. The broad public challenge, in Hawaiʻi and elsewhere, is to achieve power systems with a large share of renewable energy at the lowest possible cost while giving careful attention to matters of fairness.

The conference focuses on the institutional changes needed to accomplish this. The invited scholars, practitioners and policy makers come from the Islands, the Mainland and internationally. This website provides an overview and will be the forum through which its results can be widely distributed and discussed.

Monday - March 27, 2017
6:00-8:00pm Welcome Reception

Tuesday - March 28, 2017
8:00-9:00am Breakfast
9:00-10:15 Session I: Welcome, Introductions, Conference Goals and Process
9:00-9:05 Dick Pratt: Welcome
9:05-9:20 Michael Roberts: Motivation and goals for the conference.
Although clean energy goals themselves are an important part of debate, we want to put that issue aside and focus on how the institutions themselves need to change to make the overall system more efficient and more equitable.
9:20-9:30 Brief introductions by everyone (10 seconds or less)
9:30-9:40 Governor's remarks
9:45-9:55 Dick Pratt: Outline of conference process and schedule
9:55-10:15 What each participant sees as the most important issue or issues
10:15-10:30 Break
10:30-11:50 Session II: What are the Benefits if We "Get it Right" and the Consequences if We Don't?

Dynamic, marginal-cost pricing and open access to the grid can lower costs and help integrate renewables; without them, we could have grid defection, and spiraling costs for those who cannot defect.

Facilitator: Dick Pratt, UHM, Social Sciences, Senior Adviser on International and Community Programs
Presenter: Michael Roberts, UHM Economics, Sea Grant, and UH Economic Research Organization
Primary Responders:
 · Duncan Callaway, UC Berkeley Energy and Resources Group
 · Maria Tome, Hawaiʻi Public Utilities Commission
 · Richard Barone, Hawaiian Electric Company
 · Severin Borenstein, UC Berkeley Haas School of Business and Energy Institute
Wrap-Up: Richard Newell, Resources for the Future and Duke University

12:00-1:20pm Lunch
1:30-3:00 Session III: Current Institutions and Challenges with Intermittent Renewables

What currently works, what doesn't, and why? Investment-based profit motives of utilities can conflict with more efficient solutions centered on demand-response. Transmission, distribution, generation, storage and demand response are not optimally balanced and integrated.

Facilitator: Meredith Fowlie, UC Berkeley Agricultural and Resource Economics and Energy Institute at Haas
Presenter: Matthias Fripp, UHM College of Engineering and UH Economic Research Organization
Primary Responders:
 · Matthew White, ISO New England
 · Steven Puller, Texas A&M University – Economics
 · Carl Freedman, Haiku Design and Analysis
 · Jay Griffin, Hawaiʻi Natural Energy Institute

3:00-3:20 Break
3:20-4:50 Session IV: Markets and Natural Monopolies: How has Technology Changed the Case for Regulation?

Natural monopoly in generation diminished decades ago, but market power still exists in transmission and distribution. To what extent have renewable energy and complementary technologies changed the degree and nature of natural monopoly, and therefore the overarching case for regulation? If we look 5-10 years out, does natural monopoly diminish or disappear?

Facilitator: Makena Coffman, UHM Urban and Regional Planning and UHERO
Presenter: Severin Borenstein, UC Berkeley Haas School of Business and Energy Institute
Primary Responders:
 · Richard Newell, President, Resources for the Future and former head of Energy Information Administration
 · Nori Tarui, UHM Economics and University of Hawaiʻi Economic Research Organization
 · Stephen Holland, UNC Greensboro Economics
 · Jim Alberts, Hawaiian Electric Company
 · Terry Boston, former CEO and President of PJM Interconnection
Wrap-up: Marc Matsuura, Hawaiʻi Natural Energy Institute

5:30-8:00 Dinner Reception at College Hill

Wednesday - March 29, 2017
8:00-8:30am Breakfast
8:30-10:00 Session V: Institutional Changes in Response to Renewables: How are Technology and Institutions Co-Evolving?

How have institutions already changed as a result of renewables? What are the consequences of these changes? Have the changes worked as intended? What are the unintended consequences?

Facilitator: Dick Pratt, UHM, Social Sciences, Senior Adviser on International and Community Programs
Presenter: Terry Boston Former CEO and President of PJM Interconnection
Primary Responders:
 · James Bushnell, UC Davis Economics
 · Dave Parsons, Hawaiʻi Public Utilities Commission
 · Isaac Moriwake, Earthjustice
 · Mike Yamane, Kauaʻi Island Utility Cooperative
 · Regina Finn, Lucerna Partners
Wrap-Up: Richard Wallsgrove, Blue Planet Foundation

10:00-10:20 Break
10:20-11:50

Session VI: New Ideas for Making Market-Based Power Systems Work Better with Renewable Energy
Electricity markets continue to evolve, in part to deal with issues of market power, and in part because renewable energy is causing greater price variability. What can be done to make these markets work more efficiently? How can generation be better integrated with transmission, distribution, and demand response?

Facilitator: Meredith Fowlie, UC Berkeley Agricultural and Resource Economics and Haas Energy Institute
Presenter: Steven Puller, Texas A&M University Economics
Primary Responders:
 · Regina Finn, Lucerna Partners
 · Kyle Datta, Ulupono Initiative
 · Matthew White, ISO New England
 · Alex Papalexopoulos, ECCO International, Inc.
 · Matthias Fripp, UH Mānoa Engineering and University of Hawaiʻi Economic Research Organization
Wrap-Up: Carl Bonham, University of Hawaiʻi Economic Research Organization

12:00-1:20pm Lunch
1:30-3:00 Session VII: New Ideas for Utility Regulation with Renewable Energy

How can incentives be improved? Some propose performance contracts with utilities, and these exist in certain capacities. What metrics ought to be used? Are alternative organizational structures, like government municipalities or cooperatives, any better? Are market-oriented solutions possible at the distribution level or for smaller grids like Hawaii's? If so, how?

Facilitator: Makena Coffman, UHM Urban and Regional Planning and UHERO
Presenter: Alex Papalexopoulos, ECCO International, Inc.
Primary Responders:
 · Meredith Fowlie, UC Berkeley
 · Michael Roberts, UHM Economics, Sea Grant, and UHERO
 · Terry Surles, Hawaiʻi State Energy Office
 · Duncan Callaway, UC Berkeley Energy and Resources Group
 · Mark Duda, Hawaiʻi PV Coalition
 · Dean Nishina, Hawaiʻi Division of Consumer Advocacy
Wrap-Up: Rene Kamita, Hawaiʻi Division of Consumer Advocacy

3:00-3:20 Break
3:20-5:00

Session VIII: Transitioning to a Fairer and More Efficient System: Is there a QWERTY problem?
Who gains and who loses if we transition to Utility 2.0? How are interests changing and evolving (e.g., utilities, customers, demand-response aggregators, ISOs, clean energy and storage companies)? Can these interests coalesce around a transition to fairer and more efficient governance systems? Can we anticipate where the conflicts will occur and what is the best strategy for reconciling differences?

Facilitator: Dick Pratt, UHM, Social Sciences, Senior Adviser on International and Community Programs
Presenter: Carl Freedman, Haiku Design and Analysis
Primary Responders:
 · Mina Morita, Energy Dynamics
 · Katrina Jessoe, UC Davis Agricultural and Resource Economics
 · Beia Spiller, Environmental Defense Fund
 · Douglas Codiga, Schlack Ito
 · Scott Seu, Hawaiian Electric Company
Wrap-Up: Mark Glick, Hawaiʻi Natural Energy Institute


Thursday - March 30, 2017
8:00-9:00am Breakfast
9:00-11:00 Session IX: Summary and Next Steps

We will elicit feedback to a summary of key points from conference sessions, then turn to a discussion of where we go from here.  What are the critical questions that require theoretical or empirical answers and how should academic researchers go about answering them?  What should policymakers do and when should they do it?

A summary report about the conference will be available on this website as soon as possible after its conclusion.


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